Hades: A Five-Star Odyssey through the Apocalypse

Survivors and gamers, strap in for a review that delves into the realms of both Hades, the critically acclaimed game by Supergiant Games, and the tumultuous landscape of the apocalypse. In this exploration, we’ll unpack how Hades not only deserves its five-star status but also mirrors the challenges and triumphs of surviving in a world turned upside down.

Hades immerses players into the heart of the Underworld, a realm teeming with mythical creatures and divine challenges. Similarly, the apocalypse reshapes our world, and Hades serves as an immersive escapade, offering a welcome diversion from the chaos outside.

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Zagreus, the game’s protagonist, demonstrates unwavering resilience in his quest to escape the Underworld. Similarly, survivors in the apocalypse embody this spirit, facing adversities head-on and persisting against all odds. Hades, much like the apocalypse, teaches us that even in chaos, resilience can be our greatest asset.

The roguelike nature of Hades, where each escape attempt offers unique challenges and surprises, resonates with the unpredictable nature of the apocalypse. Survivors navigate a constantly changing landscape, adapting to new threats and finding innovative solutions, much like Zagreus’ escape attempts.

Hades introduces us to an unforgettable cast of characters from Greek mythology, each with their own quirks and personalities. In the apocalypse, survivors encounter a diverse array of individuals, forming their own pantheon of characters with unique stories and backgrounds.

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Both scenarios highlight the richness of human connection amid challenging times.

From the Stygian Blade to the Eternal Spear, Hades arms players with a variety of weapons to battle mythical foes. In the apocalypse, survivors similarly repurpose tools and weapons for their own brand of destruction. Hades encourages adaptability, a crucial skill in both the game and post-apocalyptic reality.

Just as Zagreus receives mythical boons from the gods, survivors scavenge for essential resources in the apocalypse. Whether it’s a boon of health from a deity or a cache of supplies found in a desolate city, both Hades and the apocalypse underscore the importance of strategic resource management.

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Zagreus’ relentless pursuit of escape mirrors the overarching theme of survival in the apocalypse. The struggle to break free from the Underworld parallels the perpetual quest for safety and normalcy in a post-apocalyptic world.

The atmospheric soundtrack of Hades, composed by Darren Korb, adds another layer of immersion. In the apocalypse, survivors navigate their own soundscapes, whether it’s the howling wind through abandoned buildings or the distant echoes of other survivors. Both experiences are enriched by the power of sound.

Hades isn’t just a game; it’s a narrative odyssey that resonates with the trials and triumphs of surviving the apocalypse.

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As we navigate both the virtual Underworld and the real challenges of our post-apocalyptic reality, Hades stands as a beacon of entertainment and inspiration. So, fellow survivors and gamers, embrace the escapade, wield your weapons of choice, and remember that even in the darkest of times, the journey is worth every step. Happy gaming and surviving! ūüéģ

Review: Bastion (XBLA)

“There’s like a kid who wakes up and everyone’s dead and the world is gone.” That was how my husband described Bastion to me.

“Ew.” Was my response. “That sounds terrible and sad and not like a game at all.”

“I guess I can see that. It is pretty sad… Meh, try it,” he¬†said,¬†handing me the controller.

I settled in and tried it.

Immediately I was sucked into the story of The Kid as narrated by the old man with a voice made for storytelling. The Kid and I had the same questions: What¬†happened? Where’d everyone go? Where’d the world go? For the saddest premise in the world I jumped into Bastion feeling motivated and curious.

The controls were¬†intuitive¬†and the game was forgiving while I acclimated myself to my new surroundings. “The Kid just raged for a while,” The Narrator said, prompting me to move on from smashing all the boxes, objects, and general scenery as is customary in semi-similar action games. I found it easy to defeat my enemies as my ability was scaled proportionally with theirs. As the story unfolded and I learned about The Kid, Caelondia, and The Calamity that got us to the¬†world¬†as it is. ¬†I¬†fought¬†slow moving enemies with slow weapons until I able to choose between¬†brute¬†force and speed. Eventually I was able to upgrade certain aspects of my gameplay using potions from the Liquor Store[1. It was called something more clever but it sold potion upgrades that were named to¬†sound¬†like liquor. eg.: Were Whiskey].

Your goal is to fight your way through The Wilds (levels) and collect Shards ¬†to build up The Bastion, a mysterious situation that is the¬†solution¬†to the Calamity according to the narrator who clearly isn’t telling you the whole story.

The whole story is really what makes the game. While I was playing because it was a game I stuck with it because I wanted to  get to the end of the storyРand I was the one who would get there. The Kid falls because I fall and he continues on because I continued on. Somehow Supergiant Games too that evocative part of books and movies and campfire stories and brought it to an action-adventure game.

All parts of the game worked harmoniously from the controls to the story to the design to the music[2. The music is unbearably AMAZING in this game. I normally don’t¬†even¬†notice but there were levels I¬†didn’t¬†want to finish for fear of never hearing the song again.] I was immersed.

I rarely finish games, I know “boo” “hiss,” I just get done playing before the game is done and if there isn’t enough of a story I don’t care if I don’t know how it ends. This game, I needed to know and I enjoyed playing. One of my few grips with Bastion was at one point I realized the forward motion of the story slight¬†over¬†shadowed the fact that it is in fact a video game: Once you complete a level you can’t go back to it. There was a level that I accidentally completed because the finish the level button and the attack button were the same and I happened to be standing by the exit… So i was done, never to complete that level to my satisfaction again until my second play through.

Overall, I would emphatically recommend Bastion as a game, story, or album.

[rating:4.5/5]

Check out some on the beautiful screenshots: